Illustraight

straight up: illustration


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All the Colours

When I look in my jewelry drawer, I often think to myself… I should make more of my own jewelry! I can lay in bed at night and think of fantastic ideas, but often run out of time to actually make what I am dreaming about.

So, I have finally gotten my act together and started to make some pieces of my own. I do have them for sale on my Etsy store, but have also given them as personalized gifts to people I care about! I love giving handmade gifts that are one-offs that no one else will have and that no one else can give.

What do you think of the necklaces that I have made so far?

Photo 27-09-12 8 45 44 PM

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Lumi and Inkodye

I had heard about this new thing that was like screenprinting, but was much easier, so I wanted to try it!

It is called INKODYE! Instead of exposing a screen, then printing it using a squeegee onto fabric, this formula allows you to just paint it onto the fabric, expose it in the sun for 10 – 20 minutes and Ta Da! It is there!

Check it out!

I was excited because Screenprinting at school has been problematic…. exposing the screen is not always reliable. But this technique is pretty sure fire, and it is great for a one-off print which is what would happen in my classroom.

This is my first experiment, creating a little summer tote bag…. Next time I do it, I would put it in more direct sunlight, and leave it for longer! I think I just got too excited to see the final product! HAHA!

STEP ONE:

The Tote Bag…

STEP TWO:

The Inkodye

STEP THREE:

Create and invert the image using the Lumi App.

Beach Feet

STEP FOUR:

Mask off the area that you are going to paint the dye onto. (This is optional, but I think that it looks neater!) Then paint the dye onto the fabric surface. They recommend that you dilute the dye, but I wouldn’t dilute it next time so that the colour is richer. I also recommend putting newspaper in between the fabric, so that the dye stays on one side of your garment.

STEP FIVE:

Place your image onto the wet surface. The image needs to be made into a film negative. This is done by printing your image into an overhead transparency sheet. I held the image down with a sheet of glass, to make sure there was good contact between the film and the ink.

STEP SIX:

Once this is done, place your garment with the ink and film in the sun for 10 – 20 minutes. (Perhaps longer is better!) And then impatiently wait….

You will notice the dye start to change colour as the chemical reaction occurs.

STEP SEVEN:

Oh my goodness, time to reveal the design!

It looks soooo awesome! I am just imagining what I can do with this process!

STEP EIGHT:

No, it hasn’t ended yet, because we have to rinse it out with special detergent.

Once I did this I was a bit sad because the colour seems to have faded… I hope that next time if I leave the image in the sun for longer, it will bode a better result!

Once it is dry and ironed, I will post up another image to show you the finished product! I can’t wait to try it out some more!